Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Association

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Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Association

An Association of Commercial Vegetable, Potato and Berry Growers

PVGA Funds Vegetable and Small Fruit Research for 2019

This year, the Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Association will contribute about $60,000 towards vegetable research and $8,000 for small fruit research. The Board of Directors budgeted $74,000 for vegetable and small fruit research in 2019 however not all the money budgeted for small fruit research will be spent.  This year’s contributions put PVGA’s funding for research over the past 30 years at $1,179,000.

The research funding has been made possible through the profits earned at the Association’s food booth at the Farm Show and profits from the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention.

The following eleven vegetable projects are being funded for $81,600 in conjunction with the Vegetable Marketing and Research Program. The Vegetable Program which will contribute about $20,000 towards the project.  The projects approved for funding with their objectives are listed below.

 

Towards Integrated Management of Cucumber Beetles
Dr. Shelby Fleischer, Penn State Univ., Dr. Carla Burkle Thomas, Penn State Extension, and David Owens, Univ. of Delaware Extension                                $6,543
– To evaluate combining the use of trap crops and mass-trapping lures to prevent cucumber beetles from infesting cucurbit crops.

Can Overlapping Residuals Improve Weed Control in No-Till Pumpkins
Dwight D. Lingenfelter and Dr. John M. Wallace, Penn State Univ., Kelly Nichols, Univ. of Maryland Extension, Dr. Mark J. VanGessel, Univ. of Delaware                   $2,500
– Evaluate potential of Dual Magnum as an overlapping residual approach for pumpkin production throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Potential Herbicides to Control Problem Weeds in Snap Bean
Dwight D. Lingenfelter and Dr. John M. Wallace, Penn State Univ., Kelly Nichols, Univ. of Maryland Extension, Dr. Mark J. VanGessel, Univ. of Delaware                   $1,500
To evaluate herbicide effectiveness of these potential herbicides when used in combination with other herbicides as compared to current standards; To determine the effect of these herbicide treatments on snap bean stand, injury, and yield.

Keeping PA Vegetable Growers Profitable: Statewide Muskmelon Cultivar Trials
Elsa Sanchez and Francesco Di Gioia, Penn State Univ. and Tim Elkner, Tom Butzler, Bob Pollock, and Carla Burkle Thomas, Penn State Extension                    $15,000
To evaluate 23 muskmelon cultivars plus two grafted cultivars in a conventional plasticulture system.

Management of Phytophthora Blight in Cucurbits and Peppers
Elizabeth Buck, Cornell Vegetable Program                                  $4,000
– To identify zones of high and low risk to increase treatment plan efficiency and efficacy
– To document areas at risk for phytophthora introduction based on topography, water run-off, vehicle flow patterns, and irrigation water sources.
– To build layered field history maps that will include the past cultural and chemical controls to determine the most successful management approaches for the specific farm/field.
– To create maps that will interface with existing tractor RTK programs to prepare for precision ag management techniques in the future.

Breeding Fresh-Market Tomatoes for Production in PA
Majid Foolad, Penn State Univ.                                                $8,000
– To develop and widely evaluate 68 large size F1 hybrids with EB resistance and other desirable characteristics.
– To develop and widely evaluate 40 large-size F1 hybrids with LB and EB resistance and other desirable characteristics.
– To develop a total of 30 FM grape tomato F1 hybrids, all of which in large quantities for commercial evaluation.
– To develop and evaluate FM tomato breeding lines with LB resistance, conferred by Ph-3 and/or Ph-5 resistance genes (also included EB resistance).
– To field evaluate Penn State advanced FM tomato breeding lines.

Breeding Processing Tomatoes for Production in PA
Majid Foolad, Penn State Univ.                                                $6,000
– To develop and evaluate 42 processing F1 hybrids with EB resistance and other desirable characteristics
– To develop and evaluate development and evaluation of 12 processing F1 hybrids with LB resistance and other desirable characteristics, including EB resistance.
– To develop and evaluate processing tomato breeding lines with LB resistance, conferred by Ph-3 and/or Ph-5 resistance genes (also included EB resistance).
-To field evaluate Penn State advanced processing tomato breeding lines.

Developing Microbial Communities to Suppress Bacterial Diseases of Tomato
Kevin Hockett, Penn State Univ.
– To access the effect of natural tomato microbial communities to suppress foliar diseases.
– To transfer microbial communities recovered from objective 1 to select those communities that provide the greatest disease suppression.

Development of Sensor-Based Vegetable Irrigation Systems
Francesco Di Gioia, Long He, Claudia Schmidt, and Elsa Sanchez, Penn State Univ.                     $8,500
– To evaluate the efficacy of sensor-based automated irrigation systems in comparison with conventional irrigation management on a fresh-market tomato crop grown in high-tunnels under Pennsylvania growing conditions.

Coupling Host Resistance with the Evaluation of Biofungicides for the Management of Common Foliar Vegetable Diseases in Pennsylvania
Beth Gugino, Penn State Univ.                                                $5,995
– To further evaluate the use of host resistance in combination with biofungicide-based programs and conventional programs augmented with biofungicides in randomized complete split-plot trials with a minimum of four replications.

Managing Allium Leafminer
Shelby Fleischer, Penn State Univ. and Timothy Elkner, Penn State Extension                                $8,624
– To define when adult flight period occurs to help time insecticide applications, limiting applications and using cultural control.
– To improve the use of conventional and organic insecticides to manage Allium leafminer.
– To help determine the behavioral response of ALM to variation in host species and opportunities for biological control.

Viable Options for Managing Allium Leafminer (ALM) in Organic Onion Production – Year 2
Gladis Zinati and Andrew Smith, Rodale Institute                       $5,000
– To monitor ALM weekly (April-July 2019) using two colors of sticky card traps (yellow and blue) in yellow onion seedlings grown into different colors of plastic mulch and non-plastic mulch with and without row cover for early detection of ALM, population and damage.
– To access the impact of cover crop type on ALM early detection, damage, and yield.
– To monitor percentage of mycorrhizal colonization and assess its impact on ALM and onion yield.

Optimizing Inoculation Strategies to Enhance the Evaluation of Disease Management Strategies for Center Rot of Onion
Beth Gugino, Penn State Univ.                                                 $3,008
– To determine the optimal bacterial inoculation method and timing in a replicated split plot field trial with timing as the whole plot (first leaf senescence, bulb swell and bulb initiation) and inoculation method (uninoculated, toothpick inoculated, bacterial suspension with a surfactant, bacterial suspension with an abrasive – e.g. diatomaceous arth) as the subplot.

Reports on the vegetable research projects funded from 2009 to 2018, click here.