Research

PVGA Funds Vegetable and Small Fruit Research for 2022

The following eleven vegetable projects are being funded in conjunction with the Vegetable Marketing and Research Program, which will contribute $26,000 towards the $42,823 total cost of the projects.  In addition, the PVGA will contribute $10,726 on berry research (two berry projects listed last).  The projects approved for funding with their objectives are listed below.

Impact of Management Practices on Soil Health Indicators in Conventional and Organic Vegetable Cropping Systems (multiyear- Year 3)
Dr. Gladis Zinati, Director, Vegetable Systems Trial, Rodale Institute
$5,000
-to assess soil chemical and biological properties in soil samples taken in 48 pots.
-to disseminate the results to growers using various educational venues. These activities include, but are not limited to, an annual field day, a web article posted on Rodale Institute’s website, an article in a PVGA newsletter, and an online seminar in 2022.

Are Organic Herbicides Effective for Burndown Prior to Crop Establishment?
Dwight Lingenfelter and John Wallace, Penn State Department of Plant Science
$1,867
-to examine various OMRI approved herbicides to determine their effectiveness on burndown weed control.
-to evaluate these herbicides compared to competitive, non-OMRI approved products.

Potential Herbicide Programs to Control Problem Weeds in Pumpkin
Dwight Lingenfelter and John Wallace, Penn State Department of Plant Science
$1,869
-to examine various pre and post herbicide programs in pumkin (i.e., novel concepts vs. standards) to determine their effectiveness on weed control.
-to evaluate these herbicide programs on pumpkin injury and yield impact.

Improving Onion Center Rot Management Through More Precise Topping at Harvest
Beth K. Gugino and Jennie D. Mazzone, Dept. of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology, The Pennsylvania State University
$3,000
-to safeguard bulbs from bacterial disease through precision hand-topping.
-the results will be used to optimize topping recommendations at harvest.
-the results from this study in conjunction with previous onion research will be used to develop a picture tool to help gorwers rapidly assess when to harvest.

Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Pyridate in Snap Beans
John Wallace and Dwight Lingenfelter, Penn State, Department of Plant Science; Lynn Sosnoskie, Cornell University; Mark VanGessel, University of Delaware
$3,570
-to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pyridate for commercial snap bean production.
-to evaluate two formulations, Tough EC (an emulsifiable concentrate) and Lentagran WP (a wettable powder).

In-Row Cultivation Using Camera Guidance Technology in Snap Bean
John Wallace and Tosh Mazzone, Penn State University
$1,248
-understanding the tradeoff between weed control and crop tolerance is a significant knowledge gap that prevents use of row crop cultivation in horticultural crops.
-to establish a field research trial that will evaluate cultivation timing of in-row cultivation with finger-weeders and camera-based guidance to optimize weed control and minimize crop injury.

Assessing the Ability of Tomato Communities to Suppress Disease in a Transplant Setting
Kevin L. Hockett, Dept. of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology, Pennsylvania State University
$8,350
-passage a natural community for 8-10 transfers to select for bacterial spot suppression.
-evaluate the ability of the disease suppressive community developed in objective 1 to suppress bacterial spot in a tomato transplant production setting.

Evaluation of Rootstock-Scion Interaction and Yield Performance in Fresh-Market Tomato Grown in High-Tunnel
Timothy Elkner, Penn State Extension; Andrew Blunk and Francesco Di Gioia, Department of Plant Science – The Pennsylvania State University
$9,919
-to evaluate the performance of two fresh-market tomato varieties grafted onto four commercial rootstocks examining the rootstock-scion interaction effect on plant growth, nutrient uptake, yield, and fruit quality in a high tunnel under PA environmental conditions.

Keeping PA Vegetable Growers Profitable: Statewide Cultivar Trials
Elsa Sánchez, Bob Pollock, Tim Elkner, Tom Butzler, and Megan Chawner – The Pennsylvania State University Department of Plant Science and Extension
$20,000
-to evaluate early maturing, determinate, large, red, slicing tomatoes.

Final Approval for this project is pending
Breeding Processing Tomatoes for Production in PA

Majid R. Foolad, Professor of Plant Genetics, Department of Plant Science, The Pennsylvania State University
$6,000
-evaluation of a total of 40 PROC tomato F1 hybrids with EB resistance.
-evaluation of 56 PROC tomato F1 hybrids with EB + LB resistance.
-continue development and evaluation of elite inbred lines of PROC tomato with EB resistance.
-continue development and evaluation of elite inbred lines of PROC tomato with EB + LB resistance.
-establish and continuation of a project to identify and map genes for bacterial canker resistance to be used for breeding purposes.

Final Approval for this project is pending
Breeding Fresh-Market Tomatoes for Production in PA
Majid R. Foolad, Professor of Plant Genetics, Department of Plant Science, The Pennsylvania State University
$8,000
-evaluation of 95 FM large-size F1 hybrids with EB resistance.
-evaluation of 77 FM large size F1 hybrids with EB + LB resistance.
-evaluation of 90 FM grape tomato hybrids with EB and/or EB + FB resistance.
-evaluation and development of elite large-size FM tomato breeding lines with EB resistance and other desirable characteristics.
-evaluation and development of elite inbred lines of large-size FM tomato breeding lines with LB resistance and other desirable characteristics.
-evaluation and development of elite inbred lines of FM grape tomatoes with various desirable characteristics.
-establishment and continuation of a project to identify and map genes for bacterial canker resistance to be used for breeding purposes.

Identifying Sources and Virulence of Anthracnose Strains Found on Weeds in Strawberry Fields
Leah Fronk, Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension, Dr. Sara May, Dept. of Plant Pathology and Env. Microbiology, PSU, Kathleen Demchak and Dr. Richard Marini, Dept of Plant Science, PSU, Dr. Mengjun Hi, Plant Pathology, Univ. of MD
$4739
-collect weed and fruit samples from 4 strawberry farms to further evaluate potential weed hosts and attempt to obtain more isolates from the main production season.
-evaluate the relationship between the species of Colletotrichum isolated from the weeds in the fields and the species isolated from the strawberry plants and fruit.
-determine whether the isolates obtained from weeds are capable of infecting strawberry fruit.
-produce a duplicate set of isolates that can be sent to the Univ. of Maryland for fungicide resistance screening.

Comparing Media and Fertilizer Types for Strawberry Fruit and Plug Plant Production
Kathleen Demchak, Dept of Plant Science, PSU, Timothy Elkner and Krystal Snyder, Penn State Extension
$5987
-identify media mix and fertilizer combinations that could produce higher yields even with high bicarbonate water sources.
-assess media types for production of strawberry plug plants.


 Reports on the vegetable research projects funded from 2009 to 2019, click here.